Undergraduate Research

Students working on the clean bench in Prof. Gunter's lab

 

Let Your Determination Lead You

At many universities, research opportunities are only open for graduate-level students. Not Georgia Tech, and definitely not Georgia Tech AE. In a typical academic year, more than 30 percent of eligible AE undergraduates participate in research. You might surprise yourself by becoming one of them.

 

It all starts with your initiative. Find out about the six research disciplines that comprise the Georgia Tech AE graduate program. Familiarize yourself with the research projects that AE faculty are involved in. Skim their AE profiles and visit their lab websites. Talk to your academic advisor about how research might enhance your program. Then reach out: contact the faculty member whose work interests you. Find out what sort of skills Dr. Brian Gunter and a student holdin g a prototype of the RANGE satellitethey are recruiting for their research projects. Discuss the scope of any proposed research and determine the number of credit-hours you will earn upon successful completion.

Once you have both agreed on a project, the faculty will fill out paperwork granting you a permit to register for AE 2699 or AE 4699. You will also need to submit a research permit.

Credit. The credit-hours you earn may be used to meet the requirements for AE's free elective hours as well as the research requirements of the AE Honors program and the BSAE Research Option program.

Pay. For qualified students, paid undergraduate research opportunities are often available. Those students register for AE 2698 or AE 4698 and, upon completion, receive an audit grade. Audit hours do not count towards the 132 credit-hours needed for an AE degree; however, AE 2698 and AE 2698 may be used to meet the research requirements of the AE Honors and the BSAE Research Option programs.

Find out more about undergraduate research permits